Tue

16

May

2017

Chinese Oolong Tea---Fenghuang Dancong Oolong tea

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Sat

29

Apr

2017

Chinese Oolong Tea --- Tie Guan Yin

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Fri

28

Apr

2017

Chinese White Tea --- BaiHao YinZhen Tea

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Wed

26

Apr

2017

Chinese Dark Tea --- Ripe Pu-erh Tea

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Mon

24

Apr

2017

Chinese Oolong Tea --- ZhangPing ShuiXian Tea

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Thu

20

Apr

2017

Chinese Black Tea --- Keemun Congou Tea

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Thu

20

Apr

2017

Chinese Green Tea --- EnShi YuLu Tea

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Sun

16

Apr

2017

Chinese Tea Evaluation --- An Ji Bai Cha

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Wed

12

Apr

2017

Chinese tea --- Milk Oolong Tea

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Mon

10

Apr

2017

Chinese tea evaluation --- Jasmine Feng Yan Tea

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Mon

10

Apr

2017

Chinese tea evaluation --- Rose Black Tea

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Sun

09

Apr

2017

Chinese tea evaluation---Wenshan Bao-Chung Tea

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Sun

09

Apr

2017

Chinese tea evaluation---JunShan YinZhen Tea

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Fri

03

Feb

2017

Hosting A Chinese Tea Tasting Party

Hosting A Chinese Tea Tasting Party

more information, please visit 

http://chinateareview.com/tea-party

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Fri

03

Feb

2017

Tea of The Month Club

Tea of The Month Club 

Discover and Enjoy Chinese Premium Loose Tea in Each Month

more information please visit 

http://chinateareview.com/tea-club

 

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Fri

03

Feb

2017

Chinese Tea Categories

There are fifteen major tea-producing provinces in mainland China, and Taiwan also produces tea. Chinese teas are generally divided into six major types, mainly according to the method of production. These types are: green tea, black tea, Oolong tea, white tea, yellow tea and dark tea.

Besides these, there are processed sorts such as jasmine tea and compressed tea. Each type has its representative “celebrity tea”, each with its unique appearance and aroma, and some are even associated with beautiful legends.

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Tue

29

Sep

2015

Yixing Purple Clay Teapot Culture---The method of use and care Yixing teapot

After finished the new pot initiate process, now you are now ready to use Yixing teapots for preparing your first pot of tea.

1. Fill your Yixing teapot with freshly boiled water to heat up the pot. Drain the water.

2. Put one teaspoon of tea leaves into your pot. Again, fill the teapot with freshly boiled water. Drain the water quickly to rinse the tea leaves.

3. Fill the teapot a third time with boiling water, allow it to steep for at least 1 minute and enjoy your tea

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Tue

29

Sep

2015

Yixing Purple Clay Teapot Culture--- initiate and cultivate a new yixing purple clay teapot

Before using a new Yixing teapot you should prepare it so that the teapot is ready for absorbing all the fragrance of the tea leaves.

In order to season a perfect Yixing teapot, and get a good taste of your tea soup, remember only use one type of tea for that yi xing teapot. Because of the micropores of the material, which giving Yixing clay its “breathing” property and potential to render fine infusion, the taste matters of tea also very gradually build up into the pot too.This is good and bad for the user. The good part is that with repeated use, the infusion itself actually improves. The bad part is that you cannot use the same pot for a different variety of tea to avoid conflicting taste substances from different tea blending together. For example, a green style tieguanyin cannot be steeped in a pot that has been used to make golden tip puer, or even a bouquet style Phoenix oolong.

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Tue

29

Sep

2015

Yixing Purple Clay Teapot Culture--- The characteristic of Yixing purple clay and Yixing teapot

Recognized by artisans and literati centuries ago, these characteristics of the Zisha or purple clays help to make Yixing pots especially well-suited for brewing tea. Excavations have shown that the composition and structure of the clays used in making authentic Yixing teapots today closely resemble those used in pots from the 1500s and later.

Yixing Teapots are made by a very special unglazed clay material called “zisha” clay. The yixing purple clay teapot is reputed as the “first of all tea-sets in the world” for its unique material and characteristics.

Yixing clay has very special characteristics chemistry composition and texture, a 4% 0f the water absorption rate, a very low thermal conductivity, and other unique qualities, it already is confirmed and is received that Yixing clay is best raw materials for made teapot in whold world. When properly refined and fired to a high (but sub-porcelain) temperature, it produces a type of pottery that is slightly absorbent. Legend has it that if you have prepared tea in an Yixing teapot many times, you can reach a point where by adding boiled water alone you can make tea, because the teapot itself  holds enough of the tea flavour.

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Mon

28

Sep

2015

Yixing Purple Clay Teapot Culture---Full hand Yixing teapot making process 

Besides the exceptional structure and mineral composition of Yixing clay, the most unique characteristic about the Yixing teapot is the traditional coiling technique of “forging the body” that is used to make a Yixing teapot. Unlike the common “earth clay” which comes in the form of “mud,” the raw Yixing clay comes in the form of rock, and it only appears to be like “mud” after many steps of preparing and refining. For this very reason the true Yixing clay cannot be turned on a pottery wheel. The modeling methods of Yixing clay pottery, since the Zhengde period in Ming Dynasty, have been becoming more and more perfect, owing to generations of Yixing artists’ exploration and improvement as well as the progress of science and technology.

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Sat

26

Sep

2015

Tea Recipe: How to make iced tea

Iced tea (or ice tea) is a form of cold tea. Though usually served in a glass with ice, it can also refer to a tea that has been chilled or cooled. It may or may not be sweetened. Iced tea is also a popular packaged drink. It can be mixed with flavored syrup, with common flavors including lemon, raspberry, lime, passion fruit, peach, orange, strawberry, and cherry. While most iced teas get their flavor from tea leaves (Camellia sinensis), herbal teas are also sometimes served cold and referred to as iced tea. Iced tea is sometimes made by a particularly long steeping of tea leaves at lower temperature (one hour in the sun versus 5 minutes at 180-210 °F / 80-100 °C). Some people call this "sun tea". In addition, sometimes it is also left to stand overnight in the refrigerator.

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Thu

24

Sep

2015

Chinese Herbal Teas to Promote Sleep














Enjoying tea is an integral part of Chinese life, and drinking herbal tea is also a popular yet affordable way for ordinary people to relieve common ailments. Depending on what causes your sleep problem, a specific tea should be able to help you. For example, for a restless mind unable to sleep, sour jujube seed, Chinese arborvitae kernel, tuber fleece flower stem or schisandra can be used to make a tea; for insomnia due to mental fatigue, a tea made from longan aril, red dates, wolf berry or ginseng are helpful. With a nauseous or upset stomach, a hawthorn fruit or tangerine peel tea can relieve the discomfort; sleep disturbed by a headache can use a tea made from chrysanthemum, Sichuan lovage or cassia seed; a depressive or irritable mood will be alleviated with a tea made from lotus plumule, albizia flower, rose bud or jasmine.

Generally, the tea may be a combination of leaves, bark, buds and roots. When using roots or bark or other coarse components, you need to grind them properly or boil them to make a decoction. You are advised to drink the tea in the evening, which help release tension and soothe the mind after busy work.

The following are some simple tea recipes that help promote sleep.

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Thu

24

Sep

2015

Chinese Herbal Tea Recipes 

Any cozy cup of tea is likely to feel soothing when you’re under the weather or otherwise not at your best. But you can get an extra health-promoting boost from certain teas made with herbs and other natural ingredients, which practitioners of Chinese medicine have used for centuries.

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Tue

25

Aug

2015

China Traditional Health Tea

In the return to nature under the influence of the wave, take a variety of health care habit of tea is popular in the world. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), human bodies function differently with season changing. That means we’d better change our drinking, eating and living style .

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Mon

10

Aug

2015

Yaan’s dark tea: Ancient yet unknown to many

 Most of us think Pu’er when thinking of dark tea, but a visit to Yaan in Southwest China’s Sichuan province will surely put a surprise on their faces.

Pu’er is actually a small sub-division of China’s dark tea, a category of tea that requires a secondary fermentation process, also called a post-production process. Dark tea is commonly known to have the function of aiding digestion and revitalizing energy, and it has been a daily drink of the Tibetans for more than a thousand years.

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Mon

10

Aug

2015

Chinese herbal tea, a time-honored healthy drink

The Chinese herbal tea or cold tea is a drink concocted from medicinal herbals to ease the summer heat in human’s body or sore throat caused by the dry winter.

Drinking herbal tea is an age-old custom in Guangdong, Guangxi provinces, Hongkong and Macau special administrative regions, where the climates are damp and hot result in people living there easily suffer from excessive internal heat. In order to repel internal humidity and heat, people collect herbs which can clear away heat and dampness from mountains and valleys to concoct into herb tea.

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Mon

03

Aug

2015

Basic Knowledge of Pu-erh Tea

Pu'er Tea rose up in the Eastern Han Dynasty, turned into comity in the Tang Dynasty, began to be popular in the Sing Dynasty, as finalized in the Ming Dynasty and was prospered in Qing Dynasty with a history of thousand of years. Pu'er Tea tea was originally named by its central trading area, in 1729 Qing government had first established an administrative zone named Pu'er Tea zone in Yunnan. From the 1970’s, Pu'er Tea become hot in Hong Kong, Macao, Taiwan, Japan, Korea and so on. Pu'er Tea is hot because its habitat of high elevation and fogy growing environment, in is pollution-free in nature, is mellow in taste and long in the aftertaste; Moreover, the unique manufacture, transportation, packaging of Pu'er Tea made it become a unique second fermenting tea, thus has formed it’s the unique crusted fragrance and the health care function.

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Tue

28

Jul

2015

How to brew tea in Chinese traditional method

Chinese tea culture refers to the methods of preparation of tea, the equipment used to make tea and the occasions in which tea is consumed in China. The terms chayi, 茶藝 ("Art of Tea") and "Tea Ceremony" have been used, but the term 茶文化 ("Tea Culture") includes more than just the ceremony. Also "culture" is easier to translate into English than the Chinese term ("art").

Tea culture in China differs from that of Europe, Britain or Japan in such things as preparation methods, tasting methods and the occasions for which it is consumed. Even now, in both casual and formal Chinese occasions, tea is consumed regularly. In addition to being a drink, Chinese tea is used in traditional Chinese medicine and inChinese cuisine.

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Thu

21

May

2015

The Atlas of Wu Yi Rock Tea 

Wu Yi Rock Tea --- Da Hong Pao

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Sun

29

Mar

2015

Choosing suitable tea sets

Tea sets
 tea sets are superfine, it is no exaggeration to say that they are half of the tea culture. To study the tea is to know and understand the tea sets well.

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Thu

14

Aug

2014

Tea Culture in China: Tea Brings Tao and Elegance

 

Chinese regard Tao as a complete system which is the rule and law of universe and life. Therefore, Chinese do not speak of Tao easily, which is different from Japanese who have tea ceremony for tea, ikebana for flower, incense lore for scent, kendo for sword, even judo and taekwondo for wrestling and striking. Among Chinese food culture, entertainment and other activities, it is tea ceremony that can only be qualified to Tao.

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Fri

08

Aug

2014

Tea set – the four precious articles of the teahouse

 

None of the so-called “four treasures of the teahouse” can be dispensed with. They are Yushu (Shiwei), Chaoshan Furnace, Mengchen Jar and Ruochen Cup.

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Fri

30

May

2014

Good Teas from Great Mountains --- LongJing (Dragon Well) Tea from Mt.WuLin

HangZhou was known in the ancient times as WuLin. The West Lake of HangZhou faces the city in the east and is encircled by mountains on the other three sides. The western, southern, and northern mountains are called Mt.WuLin as a whole. Between the lake and the mountains are many famous historic and cultural sites. The most famous are the ten views of the West Lake, namely the Melting Snow at the Broken Bridge, Autumn Moon ove the Calm Lake, Lotus in the Breeze at the Crooked Courtyard, Spring Dawn at Su Causeway, Twin Peaks Piercing the Clouds, Viewing Fish at the Flower Harbor, Three Pools Mirroring the Moon, Evening Bell at the Nanping Hill, Sunset Glow at LeiFeng Pagoda, and Orioles Singing in the Willows.

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Tue

27

May

2014

Good Teas from Great Mountains ---MaoFeng Tea from Mt.HuangShan

Mt.Huangshan is located in Huangshan City of AnHui Province. It is a world famous scenic resort and a famous tea-producing area in China. According to the legend. Yellow Emperor once practiced self cultivation and alchemy in the mountain, hence the name as “huangshan” (yellow mountain in Chinese). Mt.Huangshan has produced tea since the ancient times. Among the many famous teas it produces, the MaoFeng Tea is the most will-known.

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Fri

23

May

2014

Good Teas from Great Mountains --- Da Hong Pao (Big Red Robe) Tea from Mt.WuYi

Mt. WuYi stands in the territory of wuyishan City of FuJian Province. With beautiful landscape, it is a famous tourist resort. The well-known WuYi JiuQu stream flows through the mountain. In fact, the WuYi Rock Tea has played an important role in putting Mt.WuYi on the map.

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Mon

19

May

2014

Good Teas from Great Mountains --- ZhuYeQing Tea from Mt. Emei

Mt.Emei is located in the southwest of Emei City of SiChuan province. It is one of the four Buddist holy lands in China and the well-known site for Budda Puxian. Mt. Emei has many famous historic and cultural sites, including the Baoguo temple, Wannian temple, QingYin valley, Golden Summit, and BaiLong Cave. The board above the gate of the Baoguo temple bears 4 Chinese characters meaning “Tea and Zen in the same taste”, which reveal the in-depth relationship between the tea prodced in Mt.Emei and Buddhism.

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Fri

16

May

2014

Good Teas from Great Mountains --- YunWu (Cloud and Mist) Tea from Mt. LuShan

Mt.LuShan is located in the south of JiuJiang City of JiangXi province. It stands by the yeangtze River and the PoYang Lake. It is a key national scenic resort and has been included in the list of world natural Heritages. Mt. Lushan is a horst block mountain and has been known for its majesty, uniqueness, precipitous terrain, and elegance.

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Thu

15

May

2014

Good Teas from Great Mountains---Dancong (single clump) Tea from Mt. Phoenix

China has vast tea-production areas. Almost all the great mountains in the country produce famous teas. The great mountains have lush forests, misty cloud seas, and clear springs. Together, they make a warm, humid, and shady environment suitable for the gowth of tea trees. Almost all the famous teas made in the past and modern times are from the great mountains.

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Thu

08

May

2014

How to Preserve Pu-erh Tea

How to Preserve Pu-erh Tea?

 

Good perservation of Pu-erh tea requires appropriate tools, clean environment, ventilation and light.

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Wed

07

May

2014

How to Make a Good Cup of Tea --- Brewing Dark Tea

The dark tea has a bard texture. To fully dissolve the nutrients in the tea leaves, teapot brewing is usually adopted and the fresh boiling water is used. The tea leaves applied should occupy three and four tenth of the teapot volume. In addition, the loose dark tea can be brewed with a tureen. In that case, five to eight gram of tea leaves are applied.

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Tue

06

May

2014

How to Make a Good Cup of Tea --- Brewing Oolong Tea

Brewing of the Oolong tea requires the best-planned and most complicated producedures. Normally, the zisha clay teapot is the best for brewing the Oolong tea.The size of the teapot is chosen based on the number of the tea drinkers. There are many Oolong tea varieties and they vary widely in appearance. Different Oolong teas have the different application amounts. For the strip-shaped semisphere oolong tea, the tea leaves should fill 20% to 30% of the teapot. For the loose strip-shaped oolong tea, the tea leaves should fill 80% of the teapot. The tea ceremony of the oolong tea is called gongfu tea ceremony. In a sense, gongfu tea ceremony is the origin of modern tea ceremony.

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Tue

06

May

2014

How to Make a Good Cup of Tea --- Brewing Black Tea

There are 2 ways to brew the black tea:brewing pure tea and brewing laced tea. To brew pure tea,each gram of tea leaves needs 50ml to 60ml of water. If the broken black tea is brewed first,each gram of tea leaves needs 70ml to 80ml of water.To brewed laced tea, the condiments such as suger, milk, honey, and lemon juice are added into the tea soup. The quantity of the tea leaves depends on the taste of the drinker.

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Sat

03

May

2014

How to Make a Good Cup of Tea --- Brewing Green Tea

The true aroma, taste, and quality of the tea can be displayed only through correct brewing and tasting. There are diversified Chinese teas and each tea has its unique flavor that requires a unique way of brewing. Only by understanding the characteristics of the teas, grasping the reasonable brewing procedures, and practicing them repeatedly can one succeed in making a good cup of Chinese tea. Tea brewing can not only meet people’s material demands, but more importantly, cultivate their moral characters and mould their temper in the process.

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Mon

03

Mar

2014

4 most famous Chinese potteries.

The history of Chinese ceramic production is very long, starting about 7,000 to 8,000 years ago in the Neolithic Age by humanity’s ancestors who started the craft of making and using pottery. Among other accomplishments, porcelain is one of the most significant inventions from ancient China. The people made primitive porcelain early in the Shang Dynasty (1600 BC-1046 BC), and real porcelain was first made in the Eastern Han Dynasty (25–220). Porcelain manufacturing in China then gradually developed from the early Wei, Jin, and North and South dynasties to the most recent Ming and Qing dynasties. Ceramic, as well, was one of the 3 greatest specialties from the Western Han Dynasty (206 BC - 9 AD) and its products have become internationally known. The town of Jingdezhen in the Jiangxi Province is regarded as China’s "Porcelain Capital."

 

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Wed

12

Feb

2014

Chinese 4 big Tea Producing areas and 4 big "Tea Schools"

As the national beverage of China, tea is produced in vast areas in the country, from Hainan Island down in the extreme south to Shandong Province in the north, from Tibet in the southwest to Taiwan across the Straits. According to a report released by the China Social Science Academy Press, China is the world's largest tea producer. It produced 1.3 million tonnes in 2009, accounting for 31 percent of the world total. China's tea plantations amount to a total area of 1.86 million hectares, about half of the world's total tea growing space.

Because of varying geographic location and climate, different regions grow various kinds of tea. In general, there are four tea-producing regions.

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Fri

03

Jan

2014

Yixing Purple Clay Teapot Culture---18 Types of ManSheng Zisha Clay Teapot

"ManSheng 18 Type" is 18 types of zisha clay teapots created by ManSheng Chen.

ManSheng Chen is one of Chinese great artists in Qing Dynasty."ManSheng 18 types" is very important in the history of Chinese arts and crafts design.

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Wed

11

Dec

2013

Health Benefit of Drinking Yellow Tea

Yellow tea is a broad class or type of tea, usually considered as a category of its own, alongside green, black, white, oolong, and dark/hei cha (Pu-erh) teas. Of these more well-known types, yellow is most similar to green tea, but it has certain distinctive characteristics of aroma, color, and flavor, and is produced in a distinctive way.

The processing of yellow teas is similar to that for green teas, but differs in that there is an additional step, in which the gathered leaves are allowed to sit and yellow somewhat, giving the tea its distinctive character (and name). Most teas processed in this way, like huangya and Junshan yinzhen, are made exclusively from buds or leaf tips.

 

These teas are thus slightly more oxidized than green teas. Like greens, further oxidation is halted by the heating of the leaf, which is contrasted with white teas which are minimally processed and often will continue to oxidize somewhat in storage.

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Wed

11

Dec

2013

Health Benefit of Drinking White Tea

White tea is a true tea, meaning it is made from the buds and leaves of the Camellia sinensis plant, grown traditionally in China but now also parts of Taiwan and northern Thailand. It is uncured and unfermented. Unlike other more processed teas, the leaves and buds of white tea are left to wither in natural sunlight to prevent oxidation allowing for more pure and potent nutritional value.

Here are 11 health benefits of white tea:

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Wed

11

Dec

2013

Health Benefit of Drinking Black Tea

Black tea is one of the most widely consumed teas. This tea is prepared from the leaves of the shrub Camellia sinensis and is more oxidized than oolong, green and white teas. Thus, it generally has a stronger flavour than other varieties of tea.

The method of black tea production makes it different from other varieties of tea. After being plucked, the tea leaves are set out to be withered in order to release the moisture from them. When they lose maximum amount of moisture, the leaves are rolled either manually or with the help of machines through exposure to high temperature. Once the leaves are oxidized fully, they are sorted according to their size.

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Tue

10

Dec

2013

Health Benefits of Drinking Oolong Tea

Oolong tea is a traditional Chinese tea which is primarily grown and processed in China and Taiwan. This tea, being semi-fermented, has a unique taste that is quite distinct from the traditional black or green teas. Also known as wu long, this tea derives its name from the Chinese harvester of the same name who created it. Being native to China, it is frequently served in Chinese restaurants with meals and is commonly known as ‘Chinese restaurant tea.

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Mon

09

Dec

2013

Health Benefits of Drinking Green Tea

Green tea has increasingly become a very popular drink worldwide because of its immensely powerful health benefits. It is extraordinarily amazing what green tea can do for your health. And if you're not drinking three to four cups of green tea today, you're definitely not doing your health a big favor. Here are the 25 reasons why you should start drinking green tea right now:

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Wed

09

Oct

2013

12 Famous pu-erh tea mountain

Yunnan province produces the vast majority of pu'er tea. Indeed, the province is the source of the tea's name, Pu'er Hani and Yi Autonomous County. Pu'er is produced in almost every county and prefecture in the province, but the most famous pu'er areas are known as the Six Famous Tea Mountains.

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Fri

23

Aug

2013

Collection value of dark tea

There are mainly two collecting uses: one is for appreciation, the other is for personal taste. Due to different uses, you can choose different types of tea products. 

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Thu

22

Aug

2013

Classification and storage methods of Dark Tea

There are Brick series, Tip series and Huajuan series.

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Thu

22

Aug

2013

Health Benefits of Dark Tea

Since ancient times, it has a tradition of tea treatment. It is recorded in ancient medicine book that people used aged tea to treat diabetes, dysentery and colds. According to the modern medical science tea polyphenols, tea polysaccharide, tea saponin, amino acid, alkaloids and inorganic elements have health benefits on human beings. Tea is a special drinking which enhances human immunity and resists oxidation and aging, prevents canceration, lowers blood fat and regulates the metabolism.

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Wed

21

Aug

2013

Chinese-English of the names of Dark Tea

 Dark Tea is one of the six tea categories and only exists in China. It is also an indispensable beverage for the Chinese ethnic minorities in their daily life. Dark tea has a pleasant earthy and strong bouquet yet soft on the palate, and this aroma distinguishes itself from the other 5 major tea groups. It is great to drink this tea especially after meals. The beneficail tea microbes, formed as a result of 100% fermentation and only found in dark tea, are good for digestion and breaking down the fats. Dark tea, which is 100% fermented and and crafted, is the King of all teas. It is a century's old treasured art form for the process of making dark tea.  As the complexity of the tea develops and matures over time, the value of dark tea increases with age.

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Fri

02

Aug

2013

Traditional Porcelain-making Techniques of Jingdezhen

Jingdezhen, the only one city notable for its handicraft art among the first 24 famous cities & towns for their brilliant history & culture designated by the State Council, not only has two-thousand-year history in production of porcelain, but also is a city where all previous traditional techniques in making porcelain were synthesized & brought to their highest development in as early as the Qing Dynasty. A book written in Qing Dynasty entitled Record of Jingdezhen's Porcelain, a detailed account of Kilns in the Tang Dynasty, truly reflected how the traditional techniques were synthesized & brought to the highest development.

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Tue

18

Jun

2013

Intangible Heritage of Humanity-----Longquan celadon

Celadon is a word that is synonymous to Longquan greenware.  Besides blue and white, this is definitely one of the best know type of Chinese porcelain.  It could be found in countries along the ancient maritime silk route which linked Southeast Asia, South/west Asia. middle-east and East Africa.  The quantity of Longquan celadon wares exported during the Song and Yuan period was enormous.
The kilns producing Longquan celadons were located in southern Zhejiang province, covering ten counties with most kiln sites located at Longquan (龙泉), Qingyuan (庆元), Yunhe (云和), and Lisui (丽水).   Longquan had the most kiln sites with those located at Dayao and Jincun produced the best quality Longquan wares during the Song, Yuan and Ming period.

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Tue

26

Mar

2013

China Famous Tea Map --- Black Tea Map

Black tea is a type of tea that is more oxidized than oolong, green and white teas. All four types are made from leaves of the shrub (or small tree) Camellia sinensis. Black tea is generally stronger in flavor than the less oxidized teas. Two principal varieties of the species are used – the small-leaved Chinese variety plant, used for most other types of teas, and the large-leaved Assamese plant, which was traditionally mainly used for black tea, although in recent years some green and white have been produced.

 

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Sun

24

Mar

2013

China Famous Tea Map --- Yellow Tea Map

Yellow tea usually implies a special tea processed similarly to green tea, but with a slower drying phase, where the damp tea leaves are allowed to sit and yellow. The tea generally has a very yellow-green appearance and a smell different from both white tea and green tea. The smell is sometimes mistaken for black if the tea is cured with other herbs, but similarities in taste can still be noticed between yellow, green and white teas.It can, however, also describe high-quality teas served at the Imperial court, although this can be applied to any form of imperially-served tea.

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Fri

22

Mar

2013

China Famous Tea Map --- Oolong Tea Map

Oolong  is a traditional Chinese tea (Camellia sinensis) produced through a unique process including withering under the strong sun and oxidation before curling and twisting. Most oolong teas, especially those of fine quality, involve unique tea plant cultivars that are exclusively used for particular varieties. The degree of oxidation can range from 8% to 85%,depending on the variety and production style. This tea category is especially popular with tea connoisseurs of south China .

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Fri

22

Mar

2013

China Famous Tea Map---Green Tea Map 2

Jiangxi Province 江西

A,Lu Shan Yu Wu(Lu Shan Cloud&Fog green tea)-from Lu mountain

B,Wu Yuan Ming Mei(Wu Yuan Eyebrow green tea)-from Wu Yuan county

 

Jiangxi Province is located in Chinese green tea golden triangle with Zhejiang and Anhui Province. 54% of the province is covered by mountains, and its rich natural resources give its teas sound quality. Currently the province ranks the 10th in Chinese tea production.

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Fri

22

Mar

2013

China Famous Tea Map---Green Tea Map 1

Chinese tea may be classified in many ways. Categorizing according to processing techniques, Basic tea includes green, yellow, white, Oolong, black and dark tea. Green tea is the c to nature among all tea types.Green tea is the earliest tea processed and consumed It accounts for approximately 70% of China’s total tea yield international green tea market, China’s contribution is 70% or greater.

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Sun

03

Mar

2013

The Tea Culture of WuYi Mountain---A legendary tea

Praising words of Wuyi tea in history


Emperor Qianlong
"Wuyi Tea is the best. Its flavor is delicate and vigorous at the same time."
Lu You, Poet in Song Dynasty
"Tribute tea from the Jian River is the best in the world. Its fragrance will not fully arise until the light snowfall. Don´t worry about your tea. It can only taste better in heavy snow."
Imperial officer Sun Qiao called Wuyi tea "Wanganhou"
"Fifteen marquis of lingering sweetness were sent to Zhaige Pavilion. Pick tea leave when thunder struck, and mix the leaves in water. Tea trees grow on sunny mountain slopes near water and shrunded in mist."
Lian Heng, scholar from Taiwan
"Wuyi tea, Meng Chen´s pot, and Ruo Chen´s cup, are three necessities for appreciating tea. Without them the drinker does not feel proud, and the host does not feel polite enough to entertain guests."

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Sun

03

Mar

2013

The Tea Culture of WuYi Mountain---The charm of ancient tea

Assessment of the World Heritage Committee
The Wuyi Mountains is the most renowned biological reserve in southeastern China, and also the refuge for many ancient plants including ones that only grow in China. The valley along the Jiuqu Stream is beautiful and there are many temples on both sides of the stream, although some have been ruined. Mount Wuyi once provided an excellent geographical environment for the idealistic philosophy of the Tang and Song Dynasties to develop and spread. Since the 11th century, the idealist philosophy heavily affected the culture of China’s eastern regions. In the 1st century, the governors of the Han Dynasty established a large administrative capital beside Chengcun village. The capital was surrounded by thick and solid walls and has extremely high archeological value.

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Sun

03

Mar

2013

The Tea Culture of WuYi Mountain---The Tea Road

Many people have heard of the Tea-Horse Trail, a network of horse paths that originated in southwest China's Yunnan Province, bringing tea to Myanmar, India and Tibet. But there was also a northern route which in the grand scale of Chinese history, has been less famous but still important. 
For almost 300 years, the Tea Road, also known as the Russian Caravan, Moscow Route or the Siberian Route, carried tea from southeast China's Fujian Province to Mongolia and Russia. The "Jin Merchants" of Shanxi Province helped build an economic relationship between the three regions and brought China's tea culture to the northern world.

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Sun

03

Mar

2013

The Tea Culture of WuYi Mountain---History of Tea Cultivation

Wuyi Rock Tea enjoys a long history. Being one of the top tea in China, it is also the forefather of Oolong tea. It played an important role in the tea development in China. During the North and South Dynasty (about 479 A.D) the tea had already been well-known. Later in Song and Yuan Dynasty it was paid as a tribute to the royal family. In the sixth year of Dade Reign in Yuan Dynasty (about 1302 A.D), a Royal Tea Garden was set up by the bank of the Fourth-bend of the river. In Ming Dynasty tea makers improved the tea-processing techniques, thus producing the oolong tea, which is the present Rock tea. In the 17th century, Wuyi tea was even sold abroad and enjoyed an even greater reputation.

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Thu

31

Jan

2013

China Gong-Fu Tea Ceremony

Gongfu tea is famous in every household in chaoshan district. It is often the case that they make tea and serve their guests. Chaoshan gongfu tea is very well-known custom in China culture and it is one of four Golden Flower in the southern place. The fundamental spirit of it can be seen as the following: peace, love refinement and nobleness. Peace represents the harmonious atmosphere. Love represents the kindness, refinement represents the beauty of tea set and the particular way of making tea and nobleness represents the nobility of the mind.

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Tue

22

Jan

2013

Famous tea outside China --- Japanese Green Tea

Matcha is a variety of finely-powdered green tea. Matcha Uji means "froth of liquid jade" and the cultural activity called the Japanese tea ceremony centers around the preparation, serving, and drinking of matcha. In modern times, matcha has also come to be used to flavour and dye foods such as mochi and soba noodles, green tea ice cream and a variety of wagashi (Japanese confectionery).

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Tue

22

Jan

2013

Famous tea outside China --- Rooibos Red Tea

Rooibos, meaning "red bush” in Afrikaans, is a South African plant of the Legume family  with bright green, needle-like leaves that turn red upon processing. The shrub, Aspalathus linearis, has a very limited growing area, only in the Cedarberg Mountains of the Western Cape of South Africa. The plant is totally unrelated to the normal tea plant (Camellia sinensis). The mountain-dwelling people of the Khoi tribe who live in that area were the first to develop a method for making tea from rooibos, a practice traced back at least 300 years. This tea was also appreciated by the European settlers in the 19th and 20th century. 

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Tue

22

Jan

2013

Famous teas outside China --- Chai Tea

Chai Tea

Chai is the word for "tea" in much of South Asia and many other parts of the world.Chai is so prevalent in India and Sri Lanka that it could be called their "National Drink". Chai tea is quickly becoming extremely popular in the West as people are becoming exposed to it as lattes in coffee and tea houses. Chai tea is a rich and complex beverage that has been savored for centuries in many parts of the world, especially India. In its most basic form, chai is black tea that is brewed strong with a combination of spices and is diluted with milk and sugar. The spices vary from recipe to recipe, but usually consist of cinnamon, cardamom, cloves, pepper and ginger. Chai tea is traditionally consumed hot and sweet. The sweetness is needed to bring out the full flavors of the spices. Of course the modern world has elevated chai to new planes of experience--chai ices, milkshakes, chocolate chai, non-fat, low-cal sweeteners, decaf, and so on.Masala chai is a beverage from the Indian subcontinent made by brewing tea with a mixture of aromatic Indian spices and herbs. for many English speakers outside those regions, particularly in the Western hemisphere, "chai" automatically implies "masala chai". Conversely however "chai" or "char" is also British slang, referring to tea.

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Mon

15

Oct

2012

The difference of Tie Guan Yin, Huang Jin Gui, Ben Shan and Mao Xie

Quality characteristics of Tie Guan Yin tea:

Appearance: fat, tightly

Color: green jade bloom, sand green

Soup color: green bright

Aroma: fragrance lasting

Taste: mellow and thick, sweet after taste, “Melody” clearly

Infused leaves: fat, soft and bright

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Thu

16

Aug

2012

Manufacturing process of China tea---White tea

white tea was first discovered during the Tang Dynasty, about the sixth century, and soon became the choice of the royal courts.White tea has undergone much change since 1885, when specific varieties of tea bushes were selected to make Silver Needle白毫银针 and other specialty white teas. Modern white tea appeared after that. Chinese export of these fine white teas began in 1891.

White tea is named from its unique characteristics, covered with white hair.白毫The unique quality is obtained as a result of a special processing procedure of “nofrying and no crushing.” The annual production of white tea is relatively small, just2,000 tons, about 0.1% of that of black tea. White tea is mostly produced in Fuding,Zhenghe, Jianyang, and Songxi of Fujian Province in China, and this accounts formore than 90% of the annual world production of white tea.

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Wed

15

Aug

2012

Manufacturing Process of China tea---Green tea & Black tea

Although different  teas may be produced by different processing techniques,the general  tea processing is achieved as follows: fresh tea leaves plucked →


Green tea: Fixed(or de-enzymed) -Rolled -Dried steamed or pan-fried to inactivate oxidase) 

Yellow tea: Fixed -Rolled -Yellowed 闷黄-Dried(piled and smothered to auto-oxidize)
Dark tea: Fixed -Rolled -Pile渥堆 -fermented -Dried(oxidized by the oxidases of resident microbes)
White tea: Withered -Air dried or baked Re-fired(with more fine hairs/flosses)
Oolong tea: Withered -Bruised (shaken)Partially fermented -Fixed -Rolled -Dried
Black tea:Fresh tea leaves -Withered -Rolled- Fully fermented- Dried(orthodox rolling传统造型 or CTC红碎茶)

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Tue

14

Aug

2012

Catagory of China loose tea

Tea is the second most widely consumed beverage in the world after water. Regular intake of tea is associated with improved antioxidant status in vivo, which may contribute to lowering the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and certain types of cancer. There are three major categories of tea: the nonfermented green tea, the partially fermented oolong tea, and the fully fermented black tea. (actually it is oxidation)Besides these three major teas, other teas, such as white tea and Pu-erh tea(post-femented), have also been introduced to the Western marketplace in recent years. In China, it into six types:white tea,green tea,yellow tea,oolong tea,black tea and dark tea,which are distinguished by the processing method.

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Mon

13

Aug

2012

The Manufacturing Process of pu-erh tea

Pu-erh tea, a well-known traditional Chinese tea, has been categorized as sun-driedgreen tea, and its pressed products from large tea leaves 大叶种晒青毛茶为原料(Camellia sinensis O. kuntzevar. assamica Kitamura) are manufactured mainly in Yunnan, China. In the markets,three kinds of pu-erh teas have been sold: loose pu-erh tea, pressed pu-erh tea,and pu-erh tea bags.Pu-erh tea is a popular tea with a long history, which originated from the districtsof Xi-shuang-ban-na西双版纳州, Si-mao思茅, and Lan-chuang-jiang valley澜沧江, Yunnan Province云南省,China.

Pu-erh tea is of interest to consumers because of its quality and health care function and is distinct from other kinds of tea. Because of its health care function,especially when aged, pu-erh tea is loved by many tea drinkers. The collection and drinking of pu-erh tea has become a fashion and a unique pu-erh tea culture. It is generally believed that the older the pu-erh tea, the better(under certain circumstances.

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Sun

12

Aug

2012

China tea culture: health of drinking China tea

By english.chinese.cn

 

Good Health Can Be Kept by Drinking Tea Properly

China has been famous for people’s love for drinking tea since ancient times. Chinese tea is divided into five categories; these are green tea, black tea, jasmine tea, brick tea, and Oolong tea. Green tea is the best for health. Its leaves contain effective ingredients even after they have been processed while the effective ingredients in black tea and jasmine tea are partly destroyed during the processing. According to the analysis report, vitamins contained in green tea are 5-6 times more than those contained in black tea.

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Sat

11

Aug

2012

China tea culture: methods of making tea

By english.chinese.cn

 

The Unique Tea Making Method

1. Please choose a quiet and elegant environment with fresh air.

2. Please use clean tea cups and tea sets free from extraneous odour.

3. Please use mineral water of a high quality.

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Fri

10

Aug

2012

China tea culture:Teaism (茶道 cha dao)

Pure and Lofty, Not Known to Common People –

Refined Scholar Tea文士茶

Since the ancient times, tea has indissoluble bond with refined scholars. The aura of tea drinking is related to refined scholars’ lifestyle of appreciating natural landscapes and a tranquil life indifferent to fame and wealth. Refining inclination and cultivating virtue with tea shows an internal moral practice of Chinese scholars. This set of Refined Scholar Tea originates from the hometown of Zhu Xi, the greatest Chinese scholar in the 12th century China – Wuyuan County, Jiangxi Province and what it reflects is the general style and features of refined scholars’ tea drinking in regions at the lower reaches of the Yangtze River in the late 19th century and early 20th century. 

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Thu

09

Aug

2012

The benefits of wuyi yancha(武夷岩茶)

By livestrong.com & free-press-release.com

 

Wu Yi tea is the brand name for a type of tea known as "oolong" tea. Oolong tea is considered a brown tea and encompasses the benefits of green and black tea. One of the main benefits of drinking Wu Yi tea is weight loss, but the tea has many other benefits.

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Tue

07

Aug

2012

The difference between raw pu-erh tea and ripe pu-erh tea

The difference between raw pu-erh tea(sheng cha) and ripe pu-erh tea(shou cha)

 

1,Raw pu-erh tea

Appearance:The main color of raw pu-erh tea is green ordark green. Some of them are red and yellow.White of them are Bud.

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Mon

06

Aug

2012

Knowledage about Pu-er tea

The cultural history of  Pu'er Tea
Pu'er Tea rose up in the Eastern Han Dynasty, turned into comity in the Tang Dynasty, began to be popular in the Sing Dynasty, as finalized in the Ming Dynasty and was prospered in Qing Dynasty with a history of thousand of years. Pu'er Tea tea was originally named by its central trading area, in 1729 Qing government had first established an administrative zone named Pu'er Tea zone in Yunnan. From the 1970’s, Pu'er Tea become hot in Hong Kong, Macao, Taiwan, Japan, Korea and so on. Pu'er Tea is hot because its habitat of high elevation and fogy growing environment, in is pollution-free in nature, is mellow in taste and long in the aftertaste; Moreover, the unique manufacture, transportation, packaging of Pu'er Tea made it become a unique second fermenting tea, thus has formed it’s the unique crusted fragrance and the health care function.

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Sun

05

Aug

2012

Gongfu tea ceremony

The gongfu tea ceremony or kungfu tea ceremony(Chinese: 工夫茶), is a commercialized show based on the tea preparation approach originated probably in Fujian or Guangdong.The original term "Gongfu Cha (工夫茶)" literally means "making tea with efforts". Sometimes '功' instead of '工' is used thus 功夫茶. Today, the approach is used popularly by teashops carrying tea of Chinese or Taiwan origins, and by tea connoisseurs as a way to maximize the taste of a tea selection, especially a finer one. The "ceremony" show aspect has become an entertainment in various fairs, ceremonies and tourist programs.

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Wed

01

Aug

2012

Wu Yi Yan Cha 武夷岩茶

BY china internet resource for reference 

 

1, The category of wuyi yancha
Wuyi Yancha modern varieties are named to tea, tea species complement each other, therefore, the most prominent of tea were complicated.  To facilitate the application, in addition to Need Yancha, the rest of the property for special tea, to identify the people, by definition.
 Wuyi Yancha with ancient tea, tea were replaced frequently.  Therefore Yancha classified by different people wind-chi, there is no definite conclusion.

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Wed

01

Aug

2012

Top 10 Chinese teas

By Wang Yanfang China.org.cn, July 5, 2011


Of the big three beverages: Tea, coffee and cocoa – tea is consumed by the largest number of people in China.

China is considered the home of tea. Chinese tea had begun to be exported to Japan and Korea before the Tang Dynasty (618-907). In the early period of the 17th century, Chinese tea was exported to Europe.

The tea from China is in great abundance and variety. To tell if a pot of tea is nice you can mainly rely on the color, smell, taste and form. According to these principles China.org.cn selects 10 of the most excellent from the whole of the country.

 

1,West Lake Dragon Well Tea (西湖龙井)

the West Lake Dragon Well Tea is a variety of green tea from Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province. It is well-known worldwide and is highly praised for its green color, long-lasting elegant fragrance and mellow taste.

The tea has a recorded history of over 1,000 years, and was mentioned in the oldest tea book of the Tang Dynasty (618-907). The tea is frequently offered to visiting heads of state, including the British Queen Elizabeth II and former US President Richard Nixon.

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Wed

01

Aug

2012

Tea tour:Wuyi yancha (wuyi oolong tea);the birthplace of Da Hong Pao---wuyi mountain tea production area

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Tue

19

Jun

2012

Chinese ceramics

Chinese ceramic ware shows a continuous development since the pre-dynastic periods, and is one of the most significant forms of Chinese art. China is richly endowed with the raw materials needed for making ceramics. The first types of ceramics were made during the Palaeolithic era. Chinese Ceramics range from construction materials such as bricks and tiles, to hand-built pottery vessels fired in bonfires or kilns, to the sophisticated Chinese porcelain wares made for the imperial court. Porcelain is also occasionally called "china" in English.

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Tue

29

May

2012

How to Store China loose tea

Loose leaf tea is more fragile than it might appear. When exposed to moisture, loose leaf tea can develop mold and become unusable. Heat and sunlight can leech the flavor from the tea, making the brewed drink bland or giving it an unpleasant flavor. Even strongly scented products can affect the final cup of tea; storing your loose leaf tea in a container with garlic and onions, while an extreme example, would give your finished cup a very odd flavor. With proper storage, you can keep loose leaf tea for two to 18 months depending on the type of tea.

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Sun

27

May

2012

China Procelain Overview

Porcelain, also called 'fine china', featuring its delicate texture, pleasing color, and refined sculpture, has been one of the earliest artworks introduced to the western world through the Silk Road. The earliest porcelain ware was found made of Kaolin in the Shang Dynasty (17th - 11th century BC), and possessed the common aspects of the smoothness and impervious quality of hard enamel, though pottery wares were more widely used among most of the ordinary people. Anyway it was the beginning of porcelain, which afterwards in the succeeding dynasties and due to its durability and luster, rapidly became a necessity of daily life, especially in the middle and upper classes. They were made in the form of all kinds of items, such as bowls, cups, tea sets, vases, jewel cases, incense burners, musical instruments and boxes for stationary and chess, as well as pillows for traditional doctors to use to feel one's pulse.

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Fri

25

May

2012

China tea tradition

Chinese tea culture refers to the methods of preparation of tea, the equipment used to make tea and the occasions in which tea is consumed in China. The terms chayi "Art of Tea " and "Tea Ceremony" have been used, but the term "Tea Culture" includes more than just the ceremony. Also "culture" is easier to translate into English from the Chinese term "art ".
Tea culture in China differs from that of Europe, Britain or Japan in such things as preparation methods, tasting methods and the occasions for which it is consumed. Even now, in both casual and formal Chinese occasions, tea is consumed regularly. In addition to being a drink, Chinese tea is used in traditional Chinese medicine and in Chinese cuisine.

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Thu

17

May

2012

China scented tea

Scented tea is processed from first-class green tea scented with sweet-smelling flowers. The scented teas are named after the flower with which the tea is scented: Jasmine Tea, Yulan Tea (Chloranthus Tea). Processed with flowers of subtle and distinctive scents, the teas yield a variety of refined flavor. The rich aroma of the flower and the brisk taste of the tea make the beverage a work of art.

Jasmine tea is the most popular variety of flavored tea. This is, in part because Jasmine has been used to scent and flavor every variety of tea: white, black, green and oolong. So, no matter your preference in tea, there is a Jasmine tea for you.

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Mon

14

May

2012

loss weight by drinking China loose tea

Black Tea & Weight Loss


Black Tea Increases Metabolism:Tea can accelerate weight loss by boosting the body's metabolism. At the same time, it also blocks the fattening effects of carbohydrates. This is especially true of Oolong tea. Both black tea and Oolong tea are derived from the same plant, Camellia sinensis. With black tea, the leaves are left to oxidize after they are picked. With Oolong tea, the leaves are wilted in the sun and then "bruised" to expose the juice to the air, where partial oxidation is allowed to take place before being fully dried. 

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Fri

11

May

2012

Health benefit of drinking china loose tea

Loose Leaf Tea vs. Tea Bags
Tea bags are convenient. But the quality of the tea is inferior to loose leaf teas for many reasons. Cassandra informed me that the tea in tea bags are what’s called “dust.” It’s the waste that falls from mesh screens when sorting loose leaf tea. Sometimes the dust is from lower quality tea to begin with. The paper used for the bag can also interfere with the flavor of a tea.

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Wed

02

May

2012

How to infuse China loose tea in easy way

Common Method:Take 3-5g of the tea into a cup and steep it with 85-90℃ boiling water about 3-5minutes before drinking.

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Sun

08

Apr

2012

How to brew tea with GaiWan Set

Gaiwan tea is a type of tea brewing that uses a lidded bowl for the tea. Learn more about making tea with a Gaiwan tea set with tips from a tea connoisseur in this free video on brewing tea.

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Sun

08

Apr

2012

How to brew green tea

Green tea is prepared in many different ways, and the process of steeping green tea varies as well. Learn how to brew green tea in this free video about brewing loose leaf tea.

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Wed

14

Mar

2012

China Yellow Tea

Yellow tea usually implies a special tea processed similarly to green tea, but with a slower drying phase, where the damp tea leaves are allowed to sit and yellow. The tea generally has a very yellow-green appearance and a smell different from both white tea and green tea. The smell is sometimes mistaken for black if the tea is cured with other herbs, but similarities in taste can still be drawn between yellow, green and white teas.
It can, however, also describe high-quality teas served at the Imperial court, although this can be applied to any form of imperially-served tea.

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Sun

11

Mar

2012

Tea Type specific processing

Tea is traditionally classified based on the degree or period of "fermentation" the leaves have undergone

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Sat

10

Mar

2012

Tea Processing

Tea processing is the method in which the leaves from the tea plant Camellia sinensis are transformed into the dried leaves for brewing tea. The categories of tea are distinguished by the processing they undergo. In its most general form, tea processing involves different manners and degree of oxidation of the leaves, stopping the oxidation, forming the tea and drying it. The innate flavour of the dried tea leaves is determined by the type of cultivar of the tea bush, the quality of the plucked tea leaves, and the manner and quality of the production processing they undergo.

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