Chinese Herbal Tea Recipes 

Any cozy cup of tea is likely to feel soothing when you’re under the weather or otherwise not at your best. But you can get an extra health-promoting boost from certain teas made with herbs and other natural ingredients, which practitioners of Chinese medicine have used for centuries.

Mixed Flowers Tea

Uses: Relieves constipation... acne... bitter taste in the mouth... irritability... and impatience. Best: Purchase dried, whole flowers from an herbal store or Asian market, Dr. Lee advised—do not use homegrown flowers or flower tea bags, and do not chop or crush the flowers before using. Ingredients...

1 heaping Tbsp. chamomile flowers

1 heaping Tbsp. yellow chrysanthemum flowers

1 heaping Tbsp. jasmine flowers

2 cups water

Honey, optional

Preparation: Place all flowers in a teapot or similar container. Heat water to boiling. Pour hot water over flowers and steep 20 minutes. Filter out and discard solids. If desired, reheat before drinking and/or sweeten with honey to taste.


Nut Tea

Uses: Relieves respiratory ailments (such as asthma, bronchitis and cough with phlegm)... and also promotes lustrous skin and combats pallor. Best: Use nuts that have been roasted without salt. Ingredients...

5 almonds

1½ walnuts

6 peanuts

2 cup goat’s milk or soy milk, heated

Preparation: In a coffee grinder or blender, grind all nuts to a powder. Stir nut mixture into warm or hot milk... stir again as needed while consuming (so nut powders do not sink to the bottom of the cup). For convenience: You can grind a larger quantity of nuts and store the combined powders in a sealed jar... when ready to use, stir two teaspoons of nut powder into one cup of heated milk. Caution: Do not use nut tea if you have colitis.


Ginseng-Date Tea

Uses: This tea relieves fatigue... dizziness... cold hands and cold feet... overly soft stool... and bloating. Ingredients...

⅓ tsp. chopped dried American ginseng root

⅓ tsp. finely chopped dried red dates

2 cups room-temperature water

Rock sugar, optional

Preparation: Place ginseng, dates and water in a pot. Let soak for about 30 minutes. Place on stove and bring mixture to a boil... reduce heat, cover and simmer 15 minutes.Optional: Strain out and discard solids and/or add sugar to taste, if desired. Caution:Ginseng may not be appropriate if you have a blood pressure disorder or take a blood thinner, insulin, oral hypoglycemic agents or a monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressant—check with your doctor.


Dandelion-Date Tea

Uses: Relieves flushing... eases irritability... and promotes urinary and vaginal health.Note: This is the only tea for which Dr. Lee recommends using a tea bag because bulk fresh or dried dandelion would be too strong and bitter. Ingredients...

1 dried dandelion tea bag

2 or 3 whole red dates

½ dried lotus leaf, chopped

2 cups boiling water

Preparation: Place dandelion tea bag and other ingredients in a pot. Add boiling water... reduce heat... cover and simmer 15 minutes. Strain out and discard solids before drinking.Caution: Dandelion tea may not be appropriate for people with digestive disorders, diabetes or kidney failure.


Black Sesame Tea

Uses: Combats constipation... promotes kidney health... and helps maintain lustrous hair.Ingredients...

2 tsp. powdered, roasted black sesame seeds

2 cups soymilk, heated

Preparation: Place black sesame seed powder and soy milk in a blender and process until thoroughly blended. Drink warm

Herbal Tea Recipes From China To Energize You

There comes a time in everyone’s every day living or training when you want a little more energy and you don’t want to spend a lot of money on supplements that work short term and you hit the wall like a crash dummy. So why not get it from a cup of Chinese herbal tea. The herbal tea recipes below have had a long successful relationship in martial arts and do not have any harmful side effects or contraindications.

Energizing HerbalTea Recipe #1

C

Chinese Name      Latin Name

Dang Shen               Codonopsis

Bai Zhu                  Atractylodes Rhizoma

Fu Ling                   Poria Cocos

Gan Cao                 Glycyrrhizae Glabra

Energizing HerbalTea Recipe #2

Ren Shen                Panax Ginseng

Huang Qi                Astragalus

Bai Zhu                   Atractylodes Rhizoma

Chai Hu                  Bupleurum

Chen Pi                  Citrus Aurantium

Sheng Jiang             Zingiber Officinale

Gan Cao                 Glycyrrhizae Glabra

Da Zao                   Zizyphi Fructus

Energizing HerbalTea Recipe #3

Ren Shen                Panax Ginseng

Sheng Jiang             Zingiber Officinale

Gui Pi                     Cinnamomi Cortex

Chen Pi                  Citrus Aurantium

Energizing Herbal Tea Recipe #4

Ren Shen               Panax Ginseng

Gui Pi                    Cinnamomi Cortex

Gan Cao                Glycyrrhizae Glabra

Shi Hu                    Dendobrium Hancockii

An optional ingredient that according to legend was used by Genghis Khan’s soldiers was Ma Huang. Ma Huang is a potent stimulant that must be used with caution and only in small amounts. It has been used for over a thousand years in Chinese herbal medicine to clear phlegm and mucous from the lungs and if used you might notice some coughing up of mucous. With its long history in Chinese herbal medicine it was used with no problems until it was abused in the 21st century and pretty much banned as a herbal supplement, but the raw herb is available for Traditional Chinese Medicine. If you use it, more is not better, use judiciously, better yet consult with your herbalist prior to taking since it is not good if you suffer from certain lung heat conditions.

When cooking Panax Ginseng depending on how it is purchased, sliced, whole, crosscut, the brewing times will be vary. It is suggested if you have purchased a very expensive root, to cook it separately from the other herbs first.

resource from:

http://www.bottomlinepublications.com/

https://eastmeetswest.com/chinese-herbal-tea-recipes-for-energy/

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