Tue

16

May

2017

Chinese Oolong Tea---Fenghuang Dancong Oolong tea

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Sat

29

Apr

2017

Chinese Oolong Tea --- Tie Guan Yin

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Fri

28

Apr

2017

Chinese White Tea --- BaiHao YinZhen Tea

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Wed

26

Apr

2017

Chinese Dark Tea --- Ripe Pu-erh Tea

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Mon

24

Apr

2017

Chinese Oolong Tea --- ZhangPing ShuiXian Tea

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Thu

20

Apr

2017

Chinese Black Tea --- Keemun Congou Tea

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Thu

20

Apr

2017

Chinese Green Tea --- EnShi YuLu Tea

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Sun

16

Apr

2017

Chinese Tea Evaluation --- An Ji Bai Cha

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Wed

12

Apr

2017

Chinese tea --- Milk Oolong Tea

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Mon

10

Apr

2017

Chinese tea evaluation --- Jasmine Feng Yan Tea

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Mon

10

Apr

2017

Chinese tea evaluation --- Rose Black Tea

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Sun

09

Apr

2017

Chinese tea evaluation---Wenshan Bao-Chung Tea

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Sun

09

Apr

2017

Chinese tea evaluation---JunShan YinZhen Tea

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Fri

03

Feb

2017

Hosting A Chinese Tea Tasting Party

Hosting A Chinese Tea Tasting Party

more information, please visit 

http://chinateareview.com/tea-party

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Fri

03

Feb

2017

Tea of The Month Club

Tea of The Month Club 

Discover and Enjoy Chinese Premium Loose Tea in Each Month

more information please visit 

http://chinateareview.com/tea-club

 

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Fri

03

Feb

2017

Chinese Tea Categories

There are fifteen major tea-producing provinces in mainland China, and Taiwan also produces tea. Chinese teas are generally divided into six major types, mainly according to the method of production. These types are: green tea, black tea, Oolong tea, white tea, yellow tea and dark tea.

Besides these, there are processed sorts such as jasmine tea and compressed tea. Each type has its representative “celebrity tea”, each with its unique appearance and aroma, and some are even associated with beautiful legends.

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Tue

29

Sep

2015

Yixing Purple Clay Teapot Culture---The method of use and care Yixing teapot

After finished the new pot initiate process, now you are now ready to use Yixing teapots for preparing your first pot of tea.

1. Fill your Yixing teapot with freshly boiled water to heat up the pot. Drain the water.

2. Put one teaspoon of tea leaves into your pot. Again, fill the teapot with freshly boiled water. Drain the water quickly to rinse the tea leaves.

3. Fill the teapot a third time with boiling water, allow it to steep for at least 1 minute and enjoy your tea

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Tue

29

Sep

2015

Yixing Purple Clay Teapot Culture--- initiate and cultivate a new yixing purple clay teapot

Before using a new Yixing teapot you should prepare it so that the teapot is ready for absorbing all the fragrance of the tea leaves.

In order to season a perfect Yixing teapot, and get a good taste of your tea soup, remember only use one type of tea for that yi xing teapot. Because of the micropores of the material, which giving Yixing clay its “breathing” property and potential to render fine infusion, the taste matters of tea also very gradually build up into the pot too.This is good and bad for the user. The good part is that with repeated use, the infusion itself actually improves. The bad part is that you cannot use the same pot for a different variety of tea to avoid conflicting taste substances from different tea blending together. For example, a green style tieguanyin cannot be steeped in a pot that has been used to make golden tip puer, or even a bouquet style Phoenix oolong.

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Tue

29

Sep

2015

Yixing Purple Clay Teapot Culture--- The characteristic of Yixing purple clay and Yixing teapot

Recognized by artisans and literati centuries ago, these characteristics of the Zisha or purple clays help to make Yixing pots especially well-suited for brewing tea. Excavations have shown that the composition and structure of the clays used in making authentic Yixing teapots today closely resemble those used in pots from the 1500s and later.

Yixing Teapots are made by a very special unglazed clay material called “zisha” clay. The yixing purple clay teapot is reputed as the “first of all tea-sets in the world” for its unique material and characteristics.

Yixing clay has very special characteristics chemistry composition and texture, a 4% 0f the water absorption rate, a very low thermal conductivity, and other unique qualities, it already is confirmed and is received that Yixing clay is best raw materials for made teapot in whold world. When properly refined and fired to a high (but sub-porcelain) temperature, it produces a type of pottery that is slightly absorbent. Legend has it that if you have prepared tea in an Yixing teapot many times, you can reach a point where by adding boiled water alone you can make tea, because the teapot itself  holds enough of the tea flavour.

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Mon

28

Sep

2015

Yixing Purple Clay Teapot Culture---Full hand Yixing teapot making process 

Besides the exceptional structure and mineral composition of Yixing clay, the most unique characteristic about the Yixing teapot is the traditional coiling technique of “forging the body” that is used to make a Yixing teapot. Unlike the common “earth clay” which comes in the form of “mud,” the raw Yixing clay comes in the form of rock, and it only appears to be like “mud” after many steps of preparing and refining. For this very reason the true Yixing clay cannot be turned on a pottery wheel. The modeling methods of Yixing clay pottery, since the Zhengde period in Ming Dynasty, have been becoming more and more perfect, owing to generations of Yixing artists’ exploration and improvement as well as the progress of science and technology.

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Sat

26

Sep

2015

Tea Recipe: How to make iced tea

Iced tea (or ice tea) is a form of cold tea. Though usually served in a glass with ice, it can also refer to a tea that has been chilled or cooled. It may or may not be sweetened. Iced tea is also a popular packaged drink. It can be mixed with flavored syrup, with common flavors including lemon, raspberry, lime, passion fruit, peach, orange, strawberry, and cherry. While most iced teas get their flavor from tea leaves (Camellia sinensis), herbal teas are also sometimes served cold and referred to as iced tea. Iced tea is sometimes made by a particularly long steeping of tea leaves at lower temperature (one hour in the sun versus 5 minutes at 180-210 °F / 80-100 °C). Some people call this "sun tea". In addition, sometimes it is also left to stand overnight in the refrigerator.

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Thu

24

Sep

2015

Chinese Herbal Teas to Promote Sleep














Enjoying tea is an integral part of Chinese life, and drinking herbal tea is also a popular yet affordable way for ordinary people to relieve common ailments. Depending on what causes your sleep problem, a specific tea should be able to help you. For example, for a restless mind unable to sleep, sour jujube seed, Chinese arborvitae kernel, tuber fleece flower stem or schisandra can be used to make a tea; for insomnia due to mental fatigue, a tea made from longan aril, red dates, wolf berry or ginseng are helpful. With a nauseous or upset stomach, a hawthorn fruit or tangerine peel tea can relieve the discomfort; sleep disturbed by a headache can use a tea made from chrysanthemum, Sichuan lovage or cassia seed; a depressive or irritable mood will be alleviated with a tea made from lotus plumule, albizia flower, rose bud or jasmine.

Generally, the tea may be a combination of leaves, bark, buds and roots. When using roots or bark or other coarse components, you need to grind them properly or boil them to make a decoction. You are advised to drink the tea in the evening, which help release tension and soothe the mind after busy work.

The following are some simple tea recipes that help promote sleep.

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Thu

24

Sep

2015

Chinese Herbal Tea Recipes 

Any cozy cup of tea is likely to feel soothing when you’re under the weather or otherwise not at your best. But you can get an extra health-promoting boost from certain teas made with herbs and other natural ingredients, which practitioners of Chinese medicine have used for centuries.

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Tue

25

Aug

2015

China Traditional Health Tea

In the return to nature under the influence of the wave, take a variety of health care habit of tea is popular in the world. According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), human bodies function differently with season changing. That means we’d better change our drinking, eating and living style .

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Mon

10

Aug

2015

Yaan’s dark tea: Ancient yet unknown to many

 Most of us think Pu’er when thinking of dark tea, but a visit to Yaan in Southwest China’s Sichuan province will surely put a surprise on their faces.

Pu’er is actually a small sub-division of China’s dark tea, a category of tea that requires a secondary fermentation process, also called a post-production process. Dark tea is commonly known to have the function of aiding digestion and revitalizing energy, and it has been a daily drink of the Tibetans for more than a thousand years.

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Mon

10

Aug

2015

Chinese herbal tea, a time-honored healthy drink

The Chinese herbal tea or cold tea is a drink concocted from medicinal herbals to ease the summer heat in human’s body or sore throat caused by the dry winter.

Drinking herbal tea is an age-old custom in Guangdong, Guangxi provinces, Hongkong and Macau special administrative regions, where the climates are damp and hot result in people living there easily suffer from excessive internal heat. In order to repel internal humidity and heat, people collect herbs which can clear away heat and dampness from mountains and valleys to concoct into herb tea.

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Mon

03

Aug

2015

Basic Knowledge of Pu-erh Tea

Pu'er Tea rose up in the Eastern Han Dynasty, turned into comity in the Tang Dynasty, began to be popular in the Sing Dynasty, as finalized in the Ming Dynasty and was prospered in Qing Dynasty with a history of thousand of years. Pu'er Tea tea was originally named by its central trading area, in 1729 Qing government had first established an administrative zone named Pu'er Tea zone in Yunnan. From the 1970’s, Pu'er Tea become hot in Hong Kong, Macao, Taiwan, Japan, Korea and so on. Pu'er Tea is hot because its habitat of high elevation and fogy growing environment, in is pollution-free in nature, is mellow in taste and long in the aftertaste; Moreover, the unique manufacture, transportation, packaging of Pu'er Tea made it become a unique second fermenting tea, thus has formed it’s the unique crusted fragrance and the health care function.

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Tue

28

Jul

2015

How to brew tea in Chinese traditional method

Chinese tea culture refers to the methods of preparation of tea, the equipment used to make tea and the occasions in which tea is consumed in China. The terms chayi, 茶藝 ("Art of Tea") and "Tea Ceremony" have been used, but the term 茶文化 ("Tea Culture") includes more than just the ceremony. Also "culture" is easier to translate into English than the Chinese term ("art").

Tea culture in China differs from that of Europe, Britain or Japan in such things as preparation methods, tasting methods and the occasions for which it is consumed. Even now, in both casual and formal Chinese occasions, tea is consumed regularly. In addition to being a drink, Chinese tea is used in traditional Chinese medicine and inChinese cuisine.

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Thu

21

May

2015

The Atlas of Wu Yi Rock Tea 

Wu Yi Rock Tea --- Da Hong Pao

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Sun

29

Mar

2015

Choosing suitable tea sets

Tea sets
 tea sets are superfine, it is no exaggeration to say that they are half of the tea culture. To study the tea is to know and understand the tea sets well.

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